Sustaining Focus

Customized Productivity Management Systems

As any successful change manager knows, proposing improvements which result in even the most self evident benefits still leaves management to focus on the challenge of sustaining behavioral change. No matter how rational new processes, systems, data and goals may be, they don’t automatically result in behavioral compliance or sustained disciplines. 

So, how does management focus on crossing the line between thinking about new behaviors and disciplines, and actually introducing and sustaining them? 

We’ve discussed the importance of producing indisputable evidence of problems and related benefits as a first step in change programs. We understand the effectiveness education and ‘on the job’ training and support. We think we know the path to optimizing buy-in and participation. Maintaining congruence among functional goals is critical, as is strong leadership and clear executive authority.

While excellent leaders must define the who, what, where, when, why and how of change, they must also confront and focus on the ‘whether’ (or not) of change.  

Every good change manager must know how to prepare, measure and focus on the inevitably messy transition of behavior and discipline in any change program. The rapidity and success of the program depend on it.  

 

Management systems are more than the digital ether in which to input, store and relate data.  An effective management system defines management’s focus around standardsbehaviors and disciplines. Standards define when reaction is required. Behavior consists of the desired reactions and discipline is a measure of the consistency of those reactions.

Strategizing, formulating tactics and sustaining focus are behaviors. Forecasting and planning are behaviors. Reporting and review are behaviors. Decision making and problem solving are behaviors. 

An effective management system will specify management standards, behaviors and disciplines within formal system prodedures and provide the means by which to measure compliance with those requirements over time. This extends to defining agendas, meetings and management’s short interval review responsibilities.

Management systems are themselves the framework within which to measure and control behavioral compliance. 

Systems Define Focus

As any successful change manager knows, proposing improvements which result in even the most self evident benefits still leaves management to focus on the challenge of sustaining behavioral change. No matter how rational new processes, systems, data and goals may be, they don’t automatically result in behavioral compliance or sustained disciplines. 

So, how does management focus on crossing the line between thinking about new behaviors and disciplines, and actually introducing and sustaining them? 

We’ve discussed the importance of producing indisputable evidence of problems and related benefits as a first step in change programs. We understand the effectiveness education and ‘on the job’ training and support. We think we know the path to optimizing buy-in and participation. Maintaining congruence among functional goals is critical, as is strong leadership and clear executive authority.

While excellent leaders must define the who, what, where, when, why and how of change, they must also confront and focus on the ‘whether’ (or not) of change.  

Every good change manager must know how to prepare, measure and focus on the inevitably messy transition of behavior and discipline in any change program. The rapidity and success of the program depend on it. 

Management systems are more than the digital ether in which to input, store and relate data.  An effective management system defines management’s focus around standardsbehaviors and disciplines. Standards define when reaction is required. Behavior consists of the desired reactions and discipline is a measure of the consistency of those reactions.

Strategizing, formulating tactics and sustaining focus are behaviors. Forecasting and planning are behaviors. Reporting and review are behaviors. Decision making and problem solving are behaviors. 

An effective management system will specify management standards, behaviors and disciplines within formal system prodedures and provide the means by which to measure compliance with those requirements over time. This extends to defining agendas, meetings and management’s short interval review responsibilities.

Management systems are themselves the framework within which to measure and control behavioral compliance. 

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